Yoga: A Remedy for Sleepless Nights?

Having trouble getting a sound sleep? Yoga might be the perfect remedy. A Harvard study on insomnia concluded people who practiced yoga consistently…

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Having trouble getting a sound sleep? Yoga might be the perfect remedy. A Harvard study on insomnia concluded people who practiced yoga consistently for eight weeks slept better and longer compared than those who did not practice.

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Helpful to Relax the Bodypic

Legs-Up-The-Wall(Viparita Karani) can be practiced at night before getting into bed or in the middle of the night, if you’re having trouble sleeping and waking up.  Try Nikole Fortier’s 7 minute class at Pilgrimage Yoga Online.  It’s ideal for beginners and advanced yogis.

Hope Knosher, founder of Hope’s Yoga, suggests: “Sit sideways with your right side against the wall. Exhale and gently swing your legs up onto the wall and your shoulders and head lightly down onto the floor. Coming into this pose may take some practice. Your sitting bones don’t need to be right against the wall, depending on the tightness of your hamstrings. Experiment with the position until you find the placement that works for you.

This pose is not intended to stretch the backs of the legs, so if you feel pulling in the hamstrings move farther away from the wall. Keep the lower back grounded to the floor. Make a small roll with a hand towel to place under your neck if the cervical spine at the base of your neck feels too flat. Open your shoulder blades away from your spine and release your hands and arms out to your sides, palms up.

Keep your legs relatively firm, just enough to hold them vertically in place. If you struggle to keep your legs upright, take a yoga strap or something similar and place it around your legs just below the knees and gently tighten to hold the legs up right, allowing you to further relax into the pose. Gently close and soften your eyes, then scan the body. Soften into any tightness you find along the way.” *

Calm, Steady Breathing

Practice for 5-20 minutes. Focus on calm and steady breathing.

When you are ready to come out, bend your knees halfway toward your chest and roll to one side. Use your arms to help you sit up, moving slowly and mindfully.

Raising your legs vertically, higher than the heart, can also help with blood circulation.

Hope cautions, “those who are pregnant or that have been diagnosed with glaucoma, high blood pressure, or any serious problems with the neck or spine, should consult their doctor first.”

If sleepless nights are on your mind, consider adding a meditation and relaxation class at Pilgrimage Yoga Online to your morning.

How do you deal with sleepless nights?

* Thanks to MindBodyGreen.com for permission to share this excerpt.

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Falling Into Practice

I fell into the practice of yoga several years ago when a coupe of friends of mine had invited me to attend a Moksha Hot yoga class…

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by Keith Macpherson

I fell into the practice of yoga several years ago when a coupe of friends of mine had invited me to attend a Moksha Hot yoga class. I remember walking into the studio and feeling like I stepped into another planet. The culture was so different compared to what I had known outside the walls of that building. A calm came over me as I placed my mat down in the sweaty hot room and waited for class to begin. I remember feeling very self conscious as the instructor entered the room and started referencing words I had never heard of. “Savassana this and Udyana that”. My mind raced into overdrive as I didn’t want anyone to look over and see me in the corner trying to keep up with the next to impossible stretches the people around me seemed to be so easily doing and yet somehow after the experience, I couldn’t stop thinking about how good I felt. I left the studio that day feeling so light, open and completely present. Everything seemed clearer and made more sense.

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Words Can’t Explain It

To this day, I can’t completely explain it in words. I continued to make my way back to the studio every week and the practice became a regular routine for me. It was then that my life began to change. I started absorbing more of the information being instructed to me in class; from physical cues to specific intentions and inspirations spoken to relate to the postures I was doing in my body. The yoga world became a magical place for me. It made me feel alive and free. I graduated my practice into teaching yoga and have been for several years. Although I am now in the role of a yoga instructor, I have come to see that we never stop growing. Everytime I step foot in the studio as a student or instructor, there are so many opportunities to learn and grow on so many levels. Such is life. Yoga is a remembrance of what life is really all about. It reminds us to take things one moment at a time, to breath, to stay present, to surrender our tension and holding patterns, to love and be grateful. At first, at least in my experience, it all appears to be kind of impossible. How can something so basic like stretching lead to such deep insights? I have come to see that yoga is so much more then just people stretching their bodies. It is a reflection of life. I am a big believer that we are all on a journey back to oneness. In sanskrit, (the language associated with the yoga practice), the word “yoga” means “union”. Underneath all that appears to separate us on the surface, whether it be our body size or shape, the way we look, the way we think, the choices we make, there is a deep connection that we all share. Think about it. We are all sharing this planet, we are all breathing the same air, we are all able to be present in this body because we all have beating hearts.

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30 Day Yoga Challenge Ahead!

This practice of Union deepens us and will eventually lead to a realization that we truly are all connected in a way much deeper then the physical reality that we think we are. I am passionate about making yoga accessible to everyone. It is a game changer worth trying. Over time it will improve the quality of your life. For that reason, I am launching a 30-Day yoga challenge on Instagram with my good friend Rachelle Taylor (Editor of Prairie Yogi Magazine). Together for 30 days we will be posting a picture of a yoga posture once a day for you to try and then post up a photo version of you doing the pose at the hashtag #fallintopractice. We purposely decided to put postures in this challenge that could be accessible to as many people as possible. So this is your chance! If you haven’t attempted this practice before but have been curious- try out a few postures and take that extra step to share your journey with us. Even if you have been practicing yoga for a long time- even better to encourage others to fall into their practice. There are some great incentives attached to this challenge that you can win simply by posting your photos to the hashtag including spa certificates from Thermea, NHL Jets Gear, Yoga Studio Passes at Moksha Yoga Winnipeg Lianne Gail Jewelry and some great swag from Prairie Yogi not to mention a few copies of my new yoga dvd that just got released. I hope you will take the risk and dive into to meet our invitation for you to try yoga. After all- this is the perfect time to try something new. Life is here waiting for you to expand and grow! I look forward to seeing what you come up with and hearing what you think of the practice!

Join the Instagram Challenge at http://www.instagram.com/keithmmac .

Subscribe to Keith’s daily email intentions and updates here.

 

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How To Embrace and Enjoy Running

Whether you’re an experienced marathon runner or putting in the miles as part of your yoga practice to keep yourself in shape…

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Whether you’re an experienced marathon runner or putting in the miles as part of your yoga practice to keep yourself in shape, running requires a positive attitude. Yes, some days running is a chore, and other days it’s a personal joy.

Running is About Improving Yourself

“For me, running is both exercise and a metaphor. I’m at an ordinary – or perhaps more like mediocre – level,” wrote Haruki Murukami in “What I Talk About When I Talk About Running. “But that’s not the point. The point is whether or not I improved over yesterday.”

Enjoying Each Mile

Here’s how runner Amanda C. Brooks learned to enjoy each mile and how you can, too.

  1. Embrace it.

I’ve never found a faster way to get through discomfort than to simply embrace every inch of it. The second I stop fighting, things begin falling in to place.

When we try to push through, everything feels hard. But the second you let go and just allow the run to be slower or harder, our brain seems to sigh and muscles relax, and suddenly you’ve gone further than you hoped.

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  1. Let it be a reminder.

Maybe embracing it didn’t help one bit, maybe the entire run sucked! What we all hate to acknowledge about a bad run is that it gives us an opportunity to truly appreciate those times where it feels like you could go for days without stopping and you can’t seem to wipe the grin from your face for hours after.

Thank your bad runs for being your best reminder. Allow them to wake you up to changes that need to happen with your nutrition or sleep or checking in with a doctor!

  1. It’s just running.

Non-runners tend to throw out this nugget when we’re feeling down, and in our moments of frustration it’s very hard to hear. Running is more than sweat and calories; it’s a chance to get to know ourselves. But at the end of the day, a good run or a bad run doesn’t say anything about you or your training. A bad run doesn’t mean you’re on your way to a bad race.

 

Amanda Brooks is an eight-time marathon finisher, running coach and ultra passionate runner. On her site, RunToTheFinish, she shares tips for every part of the running journey through group challenges, detailed training tips and of course delicious recovery meals!

 Thanks to MindBodyGreen.com for permission to share this excerpt.

 

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Recipe: Insanely Simple Curried Chickpea Salad

This protein-packed, uber-simple recipe is ideal for taking to work for a lunch on a bed of greens, in a butter lettuce…

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by Roberto Martin

This protein-packed, uber-simple recipe is ideal for taking to work for a lunch on a bed of greens, in a butter lettuce cup, or just eaten with crackers. It can be used as a sandwich filler, a wrap, or scooped onto seasoned sliced tomatoes when they are in season. It’s super versatile. My 9-year-old likes it, and that’s saying something.

Curried Chickpea Salad

Ingredients

  • 1 cup dried chickpeas, soaked then cooked until very tender, or two 15-ounce cans chickpeas, drained and rinsed
  • 3 celery ribs, diced small
  • 1 large organic Granny Smith apple, peeled and diced small
  • 1/2 cup toasted chopped pecans
  • 1/2 cup currants or raisins
  • 1/3 cup vegan mayonnaise
  • 1 tablespoon curry powder
  • 2 tablespoons agave syrup
  • 2 whole scallions, green parts thinly sliced and white parts minced
  • 1 large garlic clove, minced
  • kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

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Preparation

1. Place half of the chickpeas in a food processor and pulse them once or twice to chop them up a bit. This can also be done in a bowl with a potato masher.

2. Place the chickpeas and the rest of the salad ingredients in a large bowl and mix them with a rubber spatula until well combined.

3. Season the salad with salt and pepper then cover and refrigerate it for 30 minutes minimum before serving.

Roberto Martin is the author of the New York Times bestseller Vegan Cooking for Carnivores, and Roberto’s New Vegan Cooking, and is the Owner and Head Chef of Elevate, a Los Angeles-based vegan restaurant. As a personal chef (working with celebrities including Ellen DeGeneres and Portia de Rossi), he focuses on nutrition and health. Martin lives with his family in Southern California.  Thanks to mindbodygreen.com for permission to excerpt.

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3 Ways to Motivate Your Yoga Practice at Home

On a recent post-nap early evening I struggled to consciousness wondering how in the world I was going to coerce myself…

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On a recent post-nap early evening I struggled to consciousness wondering how in the world I was going to coerce myself into

doing some yoga. I had plans for later that evening and I wanted to be as conscious as possible to enjoy the evening’s activities.

I had already gotten in a cardio workout earlier in the day and knew that 20-30 minutes of yoga would get me feeling great but as I struggled to consciousness I knew the challenge ahead of me. My body only wanted more sleep and my mind was not interested in any discipline.

5 minutes of yoga works wonders!

The first thing I decided upon was that I would remove all pressure from myself by setting the goal at five minutes of yoga. Deep down I know that once I get going yoga feels to good to stop but in this case the challenge is getting going and so I set the five-minute goal. That worked.

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The next thing I did as I lay on the couch was think of something that I really enjoy that I could link to my minutes of yoga… music. I decided to put on one of my favorite groups for my five minute practice: Monk Party. It’s upbeat and dynamic yet soulful sound would make five minutes seem like nothing.

At this point I had turned the corner. This yoga practice was going to manifest. The trump card was fresh air. I realized that my sleeping had made the room a bit stale and the thought of fresh air motivated me to activity. I got up, opened the front door, air played from my iphone to my stereo system and started my very doable five-minute session.

Savasana

I know the way I am and my plan worked. Sure enough twenty-five minutes later was winding down a great yoga practice with a deep relaxation savasana that would carry me into a great evening!

Know thyself…and it’s easy to motivate!

Namaste!

Sujantra founded Pilgrimage Yoga Online designed to make yoga accessible to everyone in the comfort of their home. He is the author of 5 books and has taught meditation to over 25,000 people. He guides the Pilgrimage of the Heart Yoga Studio in San Diego, CA and studied meditation for 27 years with Sri Chinmoy.

 

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4 Keys to a Home Yoga Practice

Developing a home yoga practice can be incredibly rewarding! Keep the following tips in mind as you move forward in your yogic journey.

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Developing a home yoga practice can be incredibly rewarding! Keep the following tips in mind as you move forward in your yogic journey:

1. Gratitude

For many practitioners, the spiritual and cognitive aspects of yoga can be overshadowed by the desire for fitness. And with any fitness regimen, repetition for the sake of fitness can feel like a chore and become stale. It’s important to keep your at-home practice in perspective. It’s a gift, so anytime it feels labored to step on your mat, remember that not everyone has the knowledge of or access to this sacred practice.  Even the days when stepping on the mat seems impossible, take a breath of gratitude, remembering you are endowed with this physical body, this intellectual mind and this gift of yoga.

2. Making Time

Regardless of how busy your life seems, you have time for a personal yoga practice. But the busier your schedule, the more you must manage expectations. Don’t hold the standard of your at-home practice to the experience you receive in a studio class. There’s a different energy involved with a group practice, as opposed to being solitude on your mat. Depending on your schedule, your home practice might just be a quick 15-minute jump start to your day. Master Yoga Teacher Mark Whitwell even suggests committing to just 7-minutes per day as a positive step in developing a private practice. However long you find time to come into your practice, give yourself the gift of being fully present on your mat, even if it’s just for a few minutes.

3. Centering and Creating Intention

The best way to remain present in your practice is to take a few moments to calm your mind with deep breathing. This could be your favorite style of pranayama, or just repeating long breath cycles. Centering through deep breathing is our very best tool for unclogging some of the mind clutter, and this isn’t just yogic speak. When you use deep breathing, you tap into the body’s parasympathetic nervous system. You can think of this as the opposite of the fight or flight response, a moment when your body tells you that everything is ok, there’s nothing to worry about. And it comes from your breathing.

 Centering is also a great opportunity for setting an intention or dedication for your practice. This is simply adding mindfulness to your physical practice and an intention can be anything you’d like to give or receive during your time on the mat. Drawing a blank for your intention? Try finding a quote relative to a theme or word you’d like to use as a focal point. Try BrainyQuote.com or ThinkExist.com as a starting point for inspiration.

4. Music

When it comes to motivation, music can play a major role in keeping you moving on your mat, especially when aspiring to a longer at-home practice. Move to your favorite playlist, or better yet, create yoga specific playlists to suit your mood with online platforms like Spotify. With these programs, you can create playlists that not only reflect your energy or tempo, but also the amount of time you’d like to spend on the mat that day. Try making a 20-minute playlist, a 40-minute playlist and a one-hour playlist, and use them when it’s appropriate. And as long as the music is still going, so are you. No time for making playlists? Turn on Pandora to your favorite artist and let them handle it for you.

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