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Meditation – Building Your Home Practice

The importance of a home meditation practice and how to successfully establish one for yourSelf. Practicing meditation might just be…

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The importance of a home meditation practice and how to successfully establish one for yourSelf.

Practicing meditation might just be the best thing you can do for yourself! We’re so busy every moment of every day that we spend no time on Self-realization. Meditation is a practice where we consider the nature of our existence. Through this exercise we take stock of our life. It’s a practice of Self-awareness and Self-growth. We discover that there is more to life that just existing. We discover how to live. We discover Truth… inner Truth, outer Truth. We improve ourSelves.

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Let’s face it. When we’re by ourselves it’s easy to be lazy. We can rationalize any excuse to avoid and procrastinate (substituting low-priority endeavors for high-priority endeavors.)…  no ‘task’ is too big or small that it can’t wait until tomorrow.  And that’s part of the problem; we tend to look at meditation as a TASK. And avoiding tasks can easily become habitual.

It’s important that we reassess our perception of meditation early on. How we establish our practice initially is vital to its longevity. We want to create an anticipation about our practice so we are drawn to it. It’s important to look forward to your meditation practice! It can’t be tedious. If it becomes tedious you’ll skip it. So it’s important to establish a TIME during the day that works within your schedule. That time is set aside for your meditation practice every day.

Buddha

I recommend that you keep your regular, daily meditation short. Ten minutes is a good DAILY practice. If you want to go on a marathon meditation adventure once in a while, go for it. But your regular, daily practice should be short and sweet, an easy routine.

I practice in the morning, first thing. I get out of bed, take care of my body, make a cup and go sit down for ten minutes. It’s entirely routine. I look forward to it. It’s easy. It’s a good way for me to start my day, centering, aligning, grounding, sharpening my focus, building greater awareness. And from a practical point of view, I’m not so busy and engaged in my day yet that I can willfully avoid my practice.

Make sure your family or roommates understand that for your 10 minutes or so you are UNAVAILABLE! If you want to meditate as a family, that’s fine. But otherwise, this is your private time. Do not disturb! No kids, no spouse, no phone, no doorbell…

meditation patio

Create a Mediation Space

Create a meditation space. Establish a comfortable seat. Set up a little altar or shrine. Populate it with meaningful reminders that resonate with you. Pictures, plants, candles, statuary… it doesn’t matter what it is, necessarily. What matters is that they remind you of what you are doing there. Meditation. Devotion. Outpouring. Contemplation… And then keep your space pure. Keep it tidy. Don’t leave your coffee cup on your shrine. Straighten it up once in a while. Add new things. Let it grow with your practice. Keep it sacred.

Lastly, understand that change is inevitable. Our shrines are just tools, like meditation itself. Avoid becoming too attached to the tool. We may move, so a new shrine is in order. A while back I moved six times in three years. I reestablished a new shrine at each new location. Every shrine was different depending on space and environment. What was enduring was that I immediately created a space where I could continue my practice. It might be all too easy to have just let it slide. The first thing I do is establish a meditation space.

It doesn’t take long to establish a routine. You just have to DO IT. Once you are established you will look forward to it. SELF discovery is exciting! Practice Self-discovery daily.

Monk

You’ll be amazed what you will find!

One last thing: If you are brand new to mediation, find a guided meditation class offered at a local yoga studio or spiritual center. Participating in a few of these offerings will help you develop a meditation routine for yourself. You’ll learn the philosophy of meditation and gain some insights about basic meditation techniques that might work for you. Then, ‘cut and paste’ to create a routine for yourself. And remember, your practice will change and evolve as you grow.

Be open to change. It’s inevitable.

 

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Yoga: A Remedy for Sleepless Nights?

Having trouble getting a sound sleep? Yoga might be the perfect remedy. A Harvard study on insomnia concluded people who practiced yoga consistently…

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Having trouble getting a sound sleep? Yoga might be the perfect remedy. A Harvard study on insomnia concluded people who practiced yoga consistently for eight weeks slept better and longer compared than those who did not practice.

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Helpful to Relax the Bodypic

Legs-Up-The-Wall(Viparita Karani) can be practiced at night before getting into bed or in the middle of the night, if you’re having trouble sleeping and waking up.  Try Nikole Fortier’s 7 minute class at Pilgrimage Yoga Online.  It’s ideal for beginners and advanced yogis.

Hope Knosher, founder of Hope’s Yoga, suggests: “Sit sideways with your right side against the wall. Exhale and gently swing your legs up onto the wall and your shoulders and head lightly down onto the floor. Coming into this pose may take some practice. Your sitting bones don’t need to be right against the wall, depending on the tightness of your hamstrings. Experiment with the position until you find the placement that works for you.

This pose is not intended to stretch the backs of the legs, so if you feel pulling in the hamstrings move farther away from the wall. Keep the lower back grounded to the floor. Make a small roll with a hand towel to place under your neck if the cervical spine at the base of your neck feels too flat. Open your shoulder blades away from your spine and release your hands and arms out to your sides, palms up.

Keep your legs relatively firm, just enough to hold them vertically in place. If you struggle to keep your legs upright, take a yoga strap or something similar and place it around your legs just below the knees and gently tighten to hold the legs up right, allowing you to further relax into the pose. Gently close and soften your eyes, then scan the body. Soften into any tightness you find along the way.” *

Calm, Steady Breathing

Practice for 5-20 minutes. Focus on calm and steady breathing.

When you are ready to come out, bend your knees halfway toward your chest and roll to one side. Use your arms to help you sit up, moving slowly and mindfully.

Raising your legs vertically, higher than the heart, can also help with blood circulation.

Hope cautions, “those who are pregnant or that have been diagnosed with glaucoma, high blood pressure, or any serious problems with the neck or spine, should consult their doctor first.”

If sleepless nights are on your mind, consider adding a meditation and relaxation class at Pilgrimage Yoga Online to your morning.

How do you deal with sleepless nights?

* Thanks to MindBodyGreen.com for permission to share this excerpt.

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Best Stretches for Tight Hips

If you’re working at a desk all day at an office or in a school classroom, stretching your hips is probably the last thing on your mind…

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If you’re working at a desk all day at an office or in a school classroom, stretching your hips is probably the last thing on your mind. Most people haven’t stretched their hips for years and decades.

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Stretching Releases Tension in the Hips

The less you use your hips, the tighter they get. Hip stretches are helpful for counteracting our often sedentary lifestyles. Stretching releases all the tensions that we store in the hips. Stretching can also help avoid pains in the back and hip that occur in the course of aging.

Feel your best with these hip stretching suggestions from PopSugar.

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How are you keeping flexible?

Image courtesy of Serge Bertasius Photography at FreeDigitalPhotos.net
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Review: Tina Malia: Bridge to Vallabha

Bridge to Vallabha, a collection of eleven sacred songs and mantras, is the fifth recording from singer-songwriter, instrumentalist, sound engineer…

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by Kathy Parsons

Bridge to Vallabha, a collection of eleven sacred songs and mantras, is the fifth recording from singer-songwriter, instrumentalist, sound engineer, and producer Tina Malia.

From the Heart

Considered a visionary in the world, dream pop and sacred chant musical communities, Malia’s voice is warm, clear and lyrical. The songs are sung in a variety of languages from around the world including Sanskrit, Hebrew, Gurmukhi, and English, but Malia communicates from the heart no matter which language she is singing. 

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Classically-trained as a child, Malia discovered many female folk singers in her mid-teens when she started writing her own music. After the release of her first album, Shores of Avalon, Malia met pioneering world chant artist Jai Uttal, who recruited her to sing in his Pagan Love Orchestra. He also introduced her to the rich spiritual tradition of Sanskrit mantras.

Love of Mantra

Malia’s love of mantra is reflected on her 2005 album, Jaya Bhagavan, as well as on this new release. Her voice is the lead instrument on all of the tracks, accompanied by nylon string guitar, Rhodes piano, charangon, vibraphone, lap steel guitar, and/or cello. Singers Donna DeLory, Heather Wertheimer of Shantala, Karnamrita Das, Jai-Jagdeesh, Peia and Sasha Rose lend their talents to the mix as do Grammy-nominated pianist Peter Kater and cellist Hans Christian.

Peaceful and Smooth

All of the songs are smooth, peaceful, and soothing and Malia’s gentle voice is hypnotic. Bridge to Vallabha  is a beautiful album whether you use mantras in your daily life or simply enjoy relaxing, heartfelt music. Bridge to Vallabha is available from Amazon, iTunes and CD Baby. Check it out!

Tina’s Website     Amazon     iTunes     CD Baby

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3 Yoga Poses for Children

If you’re a stay at home parent, yoga and mindfulness can help to stretch and strengthen a child’s body while calming and focusing their mind…

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If you’re a stay at home parent, yoga and mindfulness can help to stretch and strengthen a child’s body while calming and focusing their mind.

Yoga Reduces Stress in Kids

Yoga contributes to improved concentration, more confidence and reduced level of stress in children. Parents should practice gentle yoga poses and breathing exercise with children and teenagers. It’s a wonderful way to help your kids reduce their stress and develop a lifelong appreciation for yoga.

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Three Yoga Practices

Here are three yoga practices you can try with your child, with video links.

1. Upward Facing Dog Pose – Calms the mind and energizes the body. Stretches the upper body area and reduces back aches.

2. Bridge Pose – Stretches your back and neck. Removes stress and strengthens the legs.

3. Mountain Pose – Improves body posture and strengthens legs and muscles.

Which are your favorite yoga practices for children?

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Yoga at Home Is Key to Healthier Lifestyle

A research report titled “Frequency of Yoga Practice Predicts Health: Results of a National Survey of Yoga Practitioners” suggests that home yoga practice is key to a healthier diet…

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A research report titled “Frequency of Yoga Practice Predicts Health: Results of a National Survey of Yoga Practitioners” suggests that home yoga practice is key to a healthier diet, exercise and improved mental health. Home practice of yoga is also a better predictor of health than years of class practice or class frequency.

Tosca Braun, a 200-hour Kripalu Yoga instructor and 500-hour Integrative Yoga Therapist notes, “In my own experience, home practice is sweetly satisfying. It can also become stale and rigid without continued inspiration from teachers or attendance at classes or retreats. Hitting the mat can sometimes become another box to check off, with my mind racing through the day’s events as I lose the anchors of body and breath. At other times, the strength or motivation to practice may desert me, due to life’s emotional upheavals. It is then that I am most likely to attend class or seek community, where I find the support, inspiration and belonging I have longed for in my home practice. When I return to my home yoga mat, it is that much sweeter for having been touched by sangha and a skillful teacher’s reminder to inhabit my body and breath with compassionate presence.”

Yoga Promises Healthier Life

According to the report, Yoga shows promise as an intervention targeting a number of outcomes associated with lifestyle-related health conditions including cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cancer. While aerobic exercise long has been a valuable tool in combating these health conditions, a review of clinical trials comparing exercise to yoga found yoga to be equal or superior to aerobic exercise in improving a number of outcomes associated with chronic health conditions.

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Home Practice is Key

The frequency of home practice appears to be very important— more important than how long an individual has been practicing or how many classes one takes. It’s not enough simply to learn how to do healthy behaviors. Rather, healthy behaviors must be incorporated into one’s daily life. While these findings suggest that individuals will only glean benefits from yoga practice that are proportional to the energy they are willing to invest in making it a part of their lives, the findings also suggest that they do not have to practice for years in order to reap the rewards.

What one practices, be it the different types of physical poses, breath work, or meditation, is important because the different aspects of yoga practice may well have different health benefits.

From: Alyson Ross, Erika Friedmann, Margaret Bevans, and Sue Thomas, “Frequency of Yoga Practice Predicts Health: Results of a National Survey of Yoga Practitioners,” Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, vol. 2012, Article ID 983258, 10 pages, 2012. doi:10.1155/2012/983258

 

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Why I Practice Yoga

Stepping on my mat is coming home. And as we grow up, the idea and definition of “home” becomes amorphous. It doesn’t have clean edges anymore…

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Finding Home

Stepping on my mat is coming home. And as we grow up, the idea and definition of “home” becomes amorphous. It doesn’t have clean edges anymore. Maybe it never did. Is it in San Diego, where I’ve lived for the past decade? Is it where I go for the holidays? Is it wherever my mom is? Toto, I don’t think we’re in Kansas anymore. Life gets topsy turvy sometimes and anxiety :: worry :: doubt :: fear :: loneliness often become my regular, unwanted companions. Sigh. But when I practice yoga asana I feel “home” wherever I may be: an airport waiting area, a beach somewhere, the yoga studio down the street. Lately I’ve been intentionally cultivating that home feeling within myself as I move through the world; making it a goal to find that feeling of wholeness :: safety :: okay-ness.

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Being Grounded

And each time I get on my mat, I remember: Oh, right, this is what it feels like to be grounded :: to have my feet on the earth :: to be supported :: to take risks and fall :: to try again :: to get back up :: to breath deeply :: to take flight :: to exhibit courage :: to have my own back :: to challenge myself :: to be enough as I am today :: to rest.

 

Here’s what I’ve found helps me most:

Start with Sun Salutations.

*  The moving, repetitive flow of the sun salutations is a mindless meditation that gets me out of my head, into my body, and connected with my breath.

Sun Salutations

 

Move with breath:

*  As I take deeper breaths my body relaxes, my thoughts quiet, and I find myself more connected with what’s actually happening in the present moment.

Yoga Pose on the Beach

Photo by Mario Covic

Practice outside:

*  When I get on my mat (or on the grass :: sand :: dirt) out in nature I breathe in fresh air and remember that I’m part of this universe :: earth :: world :: community. (Try it. It’s magical. And maybe you’ll inspire someone else to take a breath :: slow down :: and remember their own wholeness.)

 

Set an intention:

* Sometimes I dedicate each sun salute to a friend or choose an affirming word for each breath. It helps me feel purposeful :: connected :: home.

 

 

Lena Schmidt

 

by Lena Schmidt

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Yoga at Home – Music Playlist 1

What music are you listening to at home when you practice yoga?  The Yoga Music Playlists you hear at the…

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What music are you listening to at home when you practice yoga?  The Yoga Music Playlists you hear at the Pilgrimage Yoga studios in San Diego are created by our yoga teachers to reflect their moods, and to inspire your practice with uplifting music.  Here’s a playlist from Yoga Tribe of songs, both sublime and energizing, that will enhance your yoga practice at home.  Use the Spotify player below to hear the tracks.

What’s on your yoga music playlist?

Ommmmm…… 35 songs – 2 hours and 25 minutes

Image courtesy of Ambro at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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Falling Into Practice

I fell into the practice of yoga several years ago when a coupe of friends of mine had invited me to attend a Moksha Hot yoga class…

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by Keith Macpherson

I fell into the practice of yoga several years ago when a coupe of friends of mine had invited me to attend a Moksha Hot yoga class. I remember walking into the studio and feeling like I stepped into another planet. The culture was so different compared to what I had known outside the walls of that building. A calm came over me as I placed my mat down in the sweaty hot room and waited for class to begin. I remember feeling very self conscious as the instructor entered the room and started referencing words I had never heard of. “Savassana this and Udyana that”. My mind raced into overdrive as I didn’t want anyone to look over and see me in the corner trying to keep up with the next to impossible stretches the people around me seemed to be so easily doing and yet somehow after the experience, I couldn’t stop thinking about how good I felt. I left the studio that day feeling so light, open and completely present. Everything seemed clearer and made more sense.

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Words Can’t Explain It

To this day, I can’t completely explain it in words. I continued to make my way back to the studio every week and the practice became a regular routine for me. It was then that my life began to change. I started absorbing more of the information being instructed to me in class; from physical cues to specific intentions and inspirations spoken to relate to the postures I was doing in my body. The yoga world became a magical place for me. It made me feel alive and free. I graduated my practice into teaching yoga and have been for several years. Although I am now in the role of a yoga instructor, I have come to see that we never stop growing. Everytime I step foot in the studio as a student or instructor, there are so many opportunities to learn and grow on so many levels. Such is life. Yoga is a remembrance of what life is really all about. It reminds us to take things one moment at a time, to breath, to stay present, to surrender our tension and holding patterns, to love and be grateful. At first, at least in my experience, it all appears to be kind of impossible. How can something so basic like stretching lead to such deep insights? I have come to see that yoga is so much more then just people stretching their bodies. It is a reflection of life. I am a big believer that we are all on a journey back to oneness. In sanskrit, (the language associated with the yoga practice), the word “yoga” means “union”. Underneath all that appears to separate us on the surface, whether it be our body size or shape, the way we look, the way we think, the choices we make, there is a deep connection that we all share. Think about it. We are all sharing this planet, we are all breathing the same air, we are all able to be present in this body because we all have beating hearts.

#Fallintopractice

30 Day Yoga Challenge Ahead!

This practice of Union deepens us and will eventually lead to a realization that we truly are all connected in a way much deeper then the physical reality that we think we are. I am passionate about making yoga accessible to everyone. It is a game changer worth trying. Over time it will improve the quality of your life. For that reason, I am launching a 30-Day yoga challenge on Instagram with my good friend Rachelle Taylor (Editor of Prairie Yogi Magazine). Together for 30 days we will be posting a picture of a yoga posture once a day for you to try and then post up a photo version of you doing the pose at the hashtag #fallintopractice. We purposely decided to put postures in this challenge that could be accessible to as many people as possible. So this is your chance! If you haven’t attempted this practice before but have been curious- try out a few postures and take that extra step to share your journey with us. Even if you have been practicing yoga for a long time- even better to encourage others to fall into their practice. There are some great incentives attached to this challenge that you can win simply by posting your photos to the hashtag including spa certificates from Thermea, NHL Jets Gear, Yoga Studio Passes at Moksha Yoga Winnipeg Lianne Gail Jewelry and some great swag from Prairie Yogi not to mention a few copies of my new yoga dvd that just got released. I hope you will take the risk and dive into to meet our invitation for you to try yoga. After all- this is the perfect time to try something new. Life is here waiting for you to expand and grow! I look forward to seeing what you come up with and hearing what you think of the practice!

Join the Instagram Challenge at http://www.instagram.com/keithmmac .

Subscribe to Keith’s daily email intentions and updates here.

 

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Throw a Home Yoga Party

Create an evening as a healthful experience for your guests. Forget the burgers and dogs, and”Party Like a Yogi”…

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Want to have friends over for a really fun time? Throw a home yoga party.

“Party Like a Yogi” — Go Healthy!

Create an evening as a healthful experience for your guests. Forget the burgers and dogs, and”Party Like a Yogi”– go with healthy food and drink choices that will transport your friends into yoga heaven.

Need a teacher to lead the group?  Play the 35 minute Pilgrimage Yoga Evening Playlist for a group of classes you and your friends can take together. This includes:

1. Sunset Flow with Courtney–20 min

2. 3 part breath with Lauren–10 min

3. Conscious Relaxation with Space Imagery and Guitar–5 min

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Organize a “Pot Luck”

Organize your party as a “Pot Luck” where each guest brings a healthy dish or drink of their choice to be shared amongst the group. After practice, you all get together for a great meal.

Recipes You Can Try

If you’re an ambitious host, you can also download these tasty SaucyPants recipes (pdf) and prepare healthy and festive snacks for your guests.

The Recipes

Kale Walnut Pesto
Bruschetta: Gorgonzola + Fig, Strawberry + Goat Cheese, Goat Cheese + Soybeans
Pineapple-Peach Smoothie
Avocado Pudding
The Prana Cocktail
Pineapple Quinoa Salad

Throwing a yoga party? Tell us about it!

Image courtesy of KEKO64 at FreeDigitalPhotos.net

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Getting Into a Yoga Mindset at Home

How do you get into a yoga mindset at home? We hear from Om Yoga founder Cyndi Lee is the author of five books and the inspiration for great yoga instructors.

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OM Yoga founder Cyndi Lee is the author of five books and one of the most influential yoga teachers in the U.S. She is the first female Western yoga teacher to fully integrate yoga asana and Tibetan Buddhism in her practice and teaching. Her OM Yoga Center in NYC has become a mecca for yogis worldwide.

The Path is the Practice

Cyndi recently shared her thoughts on the best way to get into the yoga mindset at home.

“The best way to get into yoga-mind is to do yoga. The path is the practice. But if you are anything like me, you might have resistance to doing your practice even though you know you want yourself to do it. I look to the traditions I was taught by my gurus and the first thing to do to prepare for practice is to clean your space. Sweep the floor, dust your altar, gather together props you want to use that day. Don’t make this such a big project that it keeps you from practicing; just let the process of cleaning be a way to honor your practice and cultivate appreciation and excitement for it. Now you have created a home shala, a home practice zone, and it will call you to participate in it.

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Start a Yoga Library and Read

Another way to prime the pump is to stimulate your yoga-mind by reading. Begin to develop a yoga library: biographies of great yogis; practice books; philosophy books. Start each practice with a little bit of reading right on your mat. And, of course, you can always use a yoga video. Sometimes I practice to my own videos and after a while I stop following my own instructions (!) but it gets me started and then I can flow as I like that day.”

Videos Let You Take a Second Look

She also offered advice for those practicing at home with yoga videos.

“Sure, it is ideal to have an excellent yoga teacher who can give you personalized hands-on adjustments and verbal instructions but that is just not always available. So, let’s do yoga anyway. And I really feel that so many of us yoga teachers who have been teaching for decades have gotten very good at giving articulate verbal instructions which means you don’t have to look at the screen all the time anyway. You know, if you were in a live yoga class with me, you would not be looking at me but you would be listening to me all the time. So in this way, a video class and a live class are very similar. A video also offers the opportunity to rewind and listen again, to take a second look and really integrate study with practice.”

How do you get into a yoga mindset at home?

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Writing a Home Yoga Journal? Tips for Yoga Lovers

Do you keep a yoga journal? Many of us practice yoga at home to achieve improved body tone. For some, the practice of yoga…

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Do you keep a yoga journal? Many of us practice yoga at home to achieve improved body tone. For some, the practice of yoga is a peaceful meditation at the beginning or end of a hectic day. Others practice Yoga at the Office, a range of yoga classes that can be done either seated in your chair or in the cubicle.

Record Your Daily Practice

Whether your practice at home or office, yoga is a journey and that’s why keeping a journal is a great way to record one’s daily practice.

During a yoga teacher training program, Morgan Turley’s instructors suggested that she keep a yoga journal. “I could see how it could improve my life, and yet it felt out of reach somehow. It was one of the hardest things for me to do. I would stare at a blank page and wonder what to write about.”

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Helpful Tips

If you’re thinking about what to write about in your home yoga journal, we found some helpful tips.

42Yogis suggests a journal entry might include:

• Date and time of practice

• Practice details: Did I go to a class? Did I do a home practice? Did I supplement my home practice with a yoga video? What style of class was it? How long did I practice? Who was the teacher?

• How did I feel before practice?

• What asanas did I have difficulty with?

• What asanas did I finally conquer?

• What do I want to work on next time?

• How do I feel after practice?

Anna Oldfield, Yoga London, added, “There are many different ways of keeping a journal, and everyone’s method will be slightly different. Some people just keep a note of when they practiced, for how long and the style of yoga, possibly with a few comments. Others may record lengthier descriptions of how they felt, their experiences surrounding the practice and the sequences used. Once you have found your journal style, filling it in regularly will provide you with great material for future reference and will help you to keep track of your personal development.”

What do you plan to write about in your yoga journal?

 

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3 Ways to Motivate Your Yoga Practice at Home

On a recent post-nap early evening I struggled to consciousness wondering how in the world I was going to coerce myself…

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On a recent post-nap early evening I struggled to consciousness wondering how in the world I was going to coerce myself into

doing some yoga. I had plans for later that evening and I wanted to be as conscious as possible to enjoy the evening’s activities.

I had already gotten in a cardio workout earlier in the day and knew that 20-30 minutes of yoga would get me feeling great but as I struggled to consciousness I knew the challenge ahead of me. My body only wanted more sleep and my mind was not interested in any discipline.

5 minutes of yoga works wonders!

The first thing I decided upon was that I would remove all pressure from myself by setting the goal at five minutes of yoga. Deep down I know that once I get going yoga feels to good to stop but in this case the challenge is getting going and so I set the five-minute goal. That worked.

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The next thing I did as I lay on the couch was think of something that I really enjoy that I could link to my minutes of yoga… music. I decided to put on one of my favorite groups for my five minute practice: Monk Party. It’s upbeat and dynamic yet soulful sound would make five minutes seem like nothing.

At this point I had turned the corner. This yoga practice was going to manifest. The trump card was fresh air. I realized that my sleeping had made the room a bit stale and the thought of fresh air motivated me to activity. I got up, opened the front door, air played from my iphone to my stereo system and started my very doable five-minute session.

Savasana

I know the way I am and my plan worked. Sure enough twenty-five minutes later was winding down a great yoga practice with a deep relaxation savasana that would carry me into a great evening!

Know thyself…and it’s easy to motivate!

Namaste!

Sujantra founded Pilgrimage Yoga Online designed to make yoga accessible to everyone in the comfort of their home. He is the author of 5 books and has taught meditation to over 25,000 people. He guides the Pilgrimage of the Heart Yoga Studio in San Diego, CA and studied meditation for 27 years with Sri Chinmoy.

 

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Yoga Home Practice Room Ideas

Embrace Nature – Love doing your morning asanas surrounded by nature? Chant Om in an airy room that’s flooded with light…

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If you’re learning yoga and meditation online, then consider setting up a special place in your home or apartment where you can practice in a clutter free, calm atmosphere.

Go Minimalist

If you’re recreating a room for yoga, aim at a minimalist design free of distractions. A hardwood floor is ideal. You might need several yoga mats if you’re practicing on a concrete floor. If your room is carpeted, you might be able to practice without a mat.

Meg DePriest, a mother and yoga instructor in Denver, suggests you find a special place, “You don’t have to spend a ton of money or have a huge space. Just find a space in your house that makes you happy, chase the kids out every once in a while, and enjoy your practice.”

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Mediterranean Yoga Room

A peaceful, clutter-free atmosphere is ideal.  Most yoga spaces have bare floors, but adding a large rug can provide some extra cushioning.

 

Embrace Nature

Love doing your morning asanas surrounded by nature?  Chant Om in an airy room that’s flooded with light.

 

Yoga Heaven

Unsure what to do with the attic or basement in your home? Transform it into yoga gym. Add a yoga mat, some free weights, a stationary bike, and you’re ready.

 

Lighting is Key

Whether you’re transforming the corner of a room or an entire room, lighting is also important. Use dimmable lighting and shades so you can adjust the room for mood, style of practice and time of day.  “Traditionally, the lights are dimmed throughout the practice, and savasana, or the final pose, occurs in the dark,” added DePriest.

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4 Keys to a Home Yoga Practice

Developing a home yoga practice can be incredibly rewarding! Keep the following tips in mind as you move forward in your yogic journey.

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Developing a home yoga practice can be incredibly rewarding! Keep the following tips in mind as you move forward in your yogic journey:

1. Gratitude

For many practitioners, the spiritual and cognitive aspects of yoga can be overshadowed by the desire for fitness. And with any fitness regimen, repetition for the sake of fitness can feel like a chore and become stale. It’s important to keep your at-home practice in perspective. It’s a gift, so anytime it feels labored to step on your mat, remember that not everyone has the knowledge of or access to this sacred practice.  Even the days when stepping on the mat seems impossible, take a breath of gratitude, remembering you are endowed with this physical body, this intellectual mind and this gift of yoga.

2. Making Time

Regardless of how busy your life seems, you have time for a personal yoga practice. But the busier your schedule, the more you must manage expectations. Don’t hold the standard of your at-home practice to the experience you receive in a studio class. There’s a different energy involved with a group practice, as opposed to being solitude on your mat. Depending on your schedule, your home practice might just be a quick 15-minute jump start to your day. Master Yoga Teacher Mark Whitwell even suggests committing to just 7-minutes per day as a positive step in developing a private practice. However long you find time to come into your practice, give yourself the gift of being fully present on your mat, even if it’s just for a few minutes.

3. Centering and Creating Intention

The best way to remain present in your practice is to take a few moments to calm your mind with deep breathing. This could be your favorite style of pranayama, or just repeating long breath cycles. Centering through deep breathing is our very best tool for unclogging some of the mind clutter, and this isn’t just yogic speak. When you use deep breathing, you tap into the body’s parasympathetic nervous system. You can think of this as the opposite of the fight or flight response, a moment when your body tells you that everything is ok, there’s nothing to worry about. And it comes from your breathing.

 Centering is also a great opportunity for setting an intention or dedication for your practice. This is simply adding mindfulness to your physical practice and an intention can be anything you’d like to give or receive during your time on the mat. Drawing a blank for your intention? Try finding a quote relative to a theme or word you’d like to use as a focal point. Try BrainyQuote.com or ThinkExist.com as a starting point for inspiration.

4. Music

When it comes to motivation, music can play a major role in keeping you moving on your mat, especially when aspiring to a longer at-home practice. Move to your favorite playlist, or better yet, create yoga specific playlists to suit your mood with online platforms like Spotify. With these programs, you can create playlists that not only reflect your energy or tempo, but also the amount of time you’d like to spend on the mat that day. Try making a 20-minute playlist, a 40-minute playlist and a one-hour playlist, and use them when it’s appropriate. And as long as the music is still going, so are you. No time for making playlists? Turn on Pandora to your favorite artist and let them handle it for you.

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