FED UP: A Movie Review by Sujantra

You can call the people who created the movie FED UP true yogis…

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FED UP

 

The yamas are the foundation of the yoga practice. Ahimsa, non-violence is one of the yamas. This can be taken to mean both not performing violent acts and trying to prevent violence. In this sense you can call the people who created the movie FED UP true yogis.

Fed Up

The film is about the modern American diet and the harm it is doing to all of us. According to the movie, the essence of the problem is that the processed food industry is choosing private profit over public health, in particular: children’s health.

This heart retching film takes you inside the tragic world of childhood obesity. We are shown the addictive nature of sugar (more addictive than cocaine says the movie) and the tragedy of children who become addicted. To profit financially by addicting children to drugs could be considered by some to be a crime.

Obese Child

Photo by Robin Corps, License.

This 2014 movie narrated by Katie Couric takes you inside the “world’s deadliest diet” and shows the manipulation of the United States Congress by monied interests. It also explores the exploitation of children by unregulated television advertising.

As our population surpasses the 30% obesity rate and we usher in the first generation of children to deal with Type 2 diabetes the film offers a simple antidote. The change has to start locally, as local as your own fork and kitchen: prepare and eat real food.

This movie is worth a watch for anyone concerned about their own health and the health of others.

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The Ahimsa (non-violence) Dilemma, #1

The yogic journey begins with 5 moral injunctions—the yamas(Ahimsa, Satya, Asteya, Brahmacharya and Aparigraha)

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The yogic journey begins with 5 moral injunctions—the yamas(Ahimsa, Satya, Asteya, Brahmacharya and Aparigraha)—, which create harmony and balance in ones actions and thoughts. By bringing these ethical principles into one’s own life we create the fertile soil for personal growth.

The Yamas

The first, and I think foundation of all the yamas is called ahimsa, which can be translated as non-violence (ultimately in thought, word and deed!) Bringing these principles into one’s life is a very personal and subjective act; hence we will be faced with challenges and dilemmas when it comes to applying these principles.

Dilemma #1: Non-violence and Yoga

If someone is about to strike me should I let him or her strike me (therefore I am not being violent) or should I strike him or her first to prevent him or her from striking me? For a visual reference, think of Martin Luther King and his non-violent marchers getting brutalized by police with fire hoses, batons and police dogs.

If I follow yogic non-violence literally I will not strike back (hence, I am not being violent) but I am allowing violence to occur (me being hit.) Is there a difference between performing the violent act and allowing it to happen? Also, if I allow another to be violent am I allowing more violence to occur in the universe than if I simply stayed home and meditated?

Well, what do you think?

–Sujantra

 

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