Compassion

Compassion is an evolved state of being. Compassion is learned…

1

“Be kind, for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle.”Plato

“Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them, humanity cannot survive.”Dalai Lama XIV, The Art of Happiness

“Our task must be to free ourselves… by widening our circle of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature and it’s beauty.”Albert Einstein

“Compassion hurts. When you feel connected to everything, you also feel responsible for everything. And you cannot turn away. Your destiny is bound with the destinies of others. You must either learn to carry the Universe or be crushed by it. You must grow strong enough to love the world, yet empty enough to sit down at the same table with its worst horrors.”Andrew Boyd, Daily Afflictions: The Agony of Being Connected to Everything in the Universe

An Evolved State of Being

Compassion is an evolved state of being. Compassion is learned. Compassion is both a giving and a receiving. By adopting compassion as a trait, we evolve ourselves, our neighbors and communities, the world and the universe (all the same thing). Compassion is a trait that transcends all levels of enfoldment as we ascend the ladder of inclusion. Compassion is the trait that first lifts us from abject, animal barbarism. Compassion is a ‘heart quality’ and as I have written many times in the past, the heart can create more of any quality that you so desire.

Believe it or not, compassion is a trait handed down through the generations of the ‘lower’ animals, as well. Charles Darwin had some very interesting and profound thoughts on the topic. His theory of Natural Selection posits that traits beneficial to the survival of individuals get passed along to the future generations of the group, increasing the survival rate of the species. Traits not beneficial to the population get weeded out through attrition or extinction.

Survival of the Fittest

Did you know that Charles Darwin used, but did not coin the phrase, “Survival of the Fittest”? Herbert Spencer coined the phrase, principally to forward race and class distinctions. Darwin, in his volume, The Decent of Man, and Selection in Relation to Sex, posited that:

“In however complex a manner this feeling (sympathy, compassion) may have originated, as it is one of high importance to all those animals which aid and defend one another, it will have been increased through natural selection; for those communities which include the greatest number of the most sympathetic members, would flourish best, and rear the greatest number of offspring.”

And further, that “…this virtue (human concern for one another AND for lower animals), one of the noblest with which man is endowed, seems to arise incidentally from our sympathies becoming more tender and more widely diffused, until they extend to all sentient beings.”

Survival of the Kindest!

Darwin understood it as, “Survival of the Kindest!”

Cultivate compassion. Meditation helps. Meditation clears the mind of clutter so that heart qualities can manifest. As Plato said in the above quote, practice kindness… be kindness, “…for everyone you meet is fighting a harder battle.”

Note: Herbert Spencer’s phrase, ‘survival of the fittest’ becomes a more valid concept when the race and class distinctions are removed. However, one must realize that the compassionate component IS included in the survival equation; the more compassionate being is more fit to pass along to its offspring this and other evolutionary qualities, ensuring the survival of the group. Compassion is a quality, which is, “…increased through natural selection.”

Further, that evolution is more concerned with populations than it is with individuals. Groups separated by distance develop under the same principle (Natural Selection), while branching traits within disparate groups are particulars related to variables (environment, etc.).

Sources for further inquiry:

Modern Synthesis: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Modern_synthesis

View
The Secret Universe

There is a place where our true nature resides. I’ll call it, ‘The Secret Universe.’…

0

There is a place where our true nature resides. I’ll call it, ‘The Secret Universe.’ It’s a place of peace, tranquility and realization. We all have this place within us… veiled. What is this veil and how do we thin it, penetrate it?

Heart/Ego

The place where our true nature resides is our heart. The veil is our ego.

We have very clear, glaring examples all around us of egocentric behavior. And as egocentric behavior grows ideals like compassion, empathy, love, benevolence and generosity frequently fall to the ground. The ego is a very powerful part of our makeup. And it’s a necessary part of our selves; it drives us to action. But unchecked the ego can be disastrous, for ourselves and those around us, for our planet… for the universe.

‘The will is strong. The flesh is stronger.’ — Bible: Matthew 26:41 (paraphrase)

It’s so very easy to let our ego rule our life. Our outward senses are overwhelmed by so much stimulus, so much temptation. Our ego fixates on these outward things and directs us away from our heart. And so we grasp and cling and accumulate in order to placate our ego, rather than releasing these fleeting desires for a more relevant, universal understanding.

Heart Qualities

In the past I have written about the heart knowing truth. The heart knows truth, the ego ‘lies.’ The ego should motivate. The heart should guide.

Our heart is the most powerful, creative thing in the universe. Our heart can create any quality, or more of any quality that we want in our life. Think of it like this: A second child comes into your life. You don’t take love away from the first child and give it to the second… You create more love. Our heart creates more love!

In the same manner our heart can create any quality we want in our life. And cultivating heart qualities benefits not only us. As we become better, more discerning humans, our heightened awareness benefits those around us, and the universe, as well. When we become more heart-qualified so does the universe!

Live within the heart-centered space of the ‘Secret Universe.’ Meditate on the heart qualities you want in your life. Become those qualities as you create them.

View
Who am I?

I have this identity. I am this person. I have this body. I have this story…

0

I have this identity. I am this person. I have this body. I have this story… But deep down, when I slow down, I find that I have this other ‘me’ that I can’t really touch. I know it’s there. It’s very clear and yet, indefinable… ineffable, if you will. So I ask, “What is this?:” And, “Who am I?”

If you are currently practicing yoga, you have probably already come across this dilemma. In many respects, the recognition of this inner being is central to the practice of yoga. It’s called, “discovering your ‘true’ self.” In other words, we connect with the inner, indefinable, ineffable, untouchable part that we ‘discover’ is there, nebulously, veiled, secret, dormant. Who am I?

And then amazing and numerous Self-discoveries will be made.

Star Bud

Self-discovery

All of philosophy, spiritualism and religion have within the idea of Self-discovery. In fact, each considers Self-discovery to be primus, the principle purpose of life. Some doctrines would have you attain realization vicariously by devotion to a person, other doctrines, a concept. The grand idea, however, even if it is underlying, is that YOU must do the work. It is called ‘Self’-discovery, after all.

I like to think of my inner Self as being a spark of the universal. I consider how small my vessel is compared to the cosmos. And yet, I am a part of the vast cosmos. I am within it. I am not separate from it. And I was a part of the spark, the bang, if you will, that brought the cosmos into being. Every part of what is today was contained in that first spark.

Before time, I awaited…

Since time, I have unfolded…

When time ends, I will await again. ~the Author

Man and Nature

Science Breaks Down

It’s tough to swallow an idea that can’t be explained. Our intelligence only can take us so far… then intelligence breaks down. Science breaks down. What we have left is a miracle to be recognized, and to KNOW that the entirety is a miracle. It is a ‘knowing.’ It’s faith. It’s complete confidence. It’s something you feel and experience!

The imagery of the statue of Ganesha contains a beautiful example of our ineffable, inner being and how to reconcile with our physical knowledge. Ganesha is usually depicted with one broken tusk. Symbolically, the broken tusk represents the failure of intelligence on the physical plane to explain the ineffable nature of our origin and being; we have this inner Self that we can’t explain or touch. The unbroken tusk symbolizes that only faith can transcend the gap between the physical and the inner Self. In the end our intelligence fails to explain us… but we can ‘know.’ And that ’knowing’ is the basis for realization. It’s more than belief… It’s knowing! It can bring us peace; ‘the peace which passeth all understanding.’

The following quote points to this separateness thinking that confounds our efforts to find ourselves:

“There are hidden contradictions in the minds of people who “love Nature” while deploring the “artificialities” with which “Man has spoiled `Nature.’” The obvious contradiction lies in their choice of words, which imply that Man and his artifacts are not part of “Nature,” but beavers and their dams are.”

From Starship Troopers: ~Robert Heinlein

Peace

Children of the Universe

When we recognize that we are children of the universe, when we know that we are miracles, when we know that we are not separate, we are well on our way in the discovery of our true nature, our true Self.

Because I am a part of the universe, by the definition of Unity, I always have been and I always will be… Shanti, peace.

View
Simple Living, Through Simple Wakefulness

Lets face it, the act of waking up in the morning is not uncommonly experienced as an uncomfortable thing…

0

by Greg Steorts

Lets face it, the act of waking up in the morning is not uncommonly experienced as an uncomfortable thing. Those among us who find it to be a generally easy thing to bounce out of bed like an energized toddler on Christmas morning, might be in the minority. But the form of ‘wakefulness’ this essay is about, is not actually the sort I reference above, though the above example serves as a fitting metaphor for the brand of wakefulness I’ll address here. ‘Wakefulness’ as I intend to mean it here, is being defined as a product or result of employing one’s own capacity for calm critical thinking, mindful observation and one’s own capacity to simply feel. While these may at first sound like simple things, a great many of us have allowed these capacities to atrophy in ourselves, to one degree or another, and I propose that modern culture in the developed world has become a key factor in the facilitating of our inability these days to simply stop and take occasional conscious notice of the otherwise unbroken chain of moments of which our lives are comprised.

Little Room for Individual Interpretation

We have become, in a very real sense, products of the culture in which we live; where dominant social and environmental prompts shape our general responses to the stimuli around us. The official definitions of things and how we’re ‘supposed’ to relate to them, is so often laid out for us in bold type and prominent voice, leaving little room for individual interpretation; at least the sort that might be granted mainstream credibility. Media input offers itself as a prime example of this. It masterfully short-circuits the individual’s own inclination to draw their own conclusions, both boldly and subtly laying-out the parameters within which the subject, article or position is being slickly sold to us. Culture’s architects, (e.g. Madison Avenue, all facets of mainstream media; peddlers of information, social memes and pop entertainments, et al), are best served by a populace that unquestioningly partakes of, and assimilates its manufactured concepts and wares with little to no consideration as to both the overtly and passively inferred philosophies or positions within which they are framed. Culture’s main thrust, after all, is to encourage us to climb onboard the ‘ride du jour,’ whatever it may be, for this is what keeps the wheels of industry rolling.

Disdain of Culture’s Offered Trends

The space of wakefulness I refer to here, and the appreciation for the simplicity it can ultimately spawn, is not one that requires any disdain of culture’s offered trends, products or promoted philosophies, but rather only the presence of mind to simply allow one’s conscious awareness in relationship to them, to reside within the deepest recesses of their own moment-to-moment space of feeling, independent of culture’s peddled stimuli, medications, and all manner of distractions and ‘anesthesias’ (figurative and literal) which serve to pull us away from our own sense of self within the hive society. The ‘simplicity through wakefulness’ I’m speaking of here, is one achieved by the act of simply being willing to unplug occasionally (or better yet, regularly) from culture’s ceaseless flow of stimulus, long enough to allow oneself to truly feel whatever it is that may lie beneath the stratums of content culture so eagerly fills our minds and heart space with. For many of us, even the notion of a ‘heart space’ may ring as something too esoteric to be meaningful, so long have we been disconnected from it by our longstanding immersions into the sensory stimulations to which I refer. The ceaseless and torrential flow of input has become a boisterous child that will not be ignored, we its negligent and enabling parents. Living in the ‘information age,’ as we now do, with technology and its devices serving as the virtual hub upon which our day-to-day lives spin, it has effectively served to dislocate us from a more visceral, human-to-human connection, from our own sense of individualism, as well as a lack of connection to oneself.

Meditators

Sitting Quietly with Do Distractions

No doubt about it, it is not fun to feel uncomfortable emotions, and it is always an easy thing to bury a low-current hum of discomfort with the distraction of a movie, a phone call, a video game, or to check-in with our online social network of choice to see how many people ‘like’ us. Sitting quietly with no distractions has become an alien concept for us, and the notion of simplicity too has become a thing of virtually no relevance. The rapid-fire images of TV programming, commercials and film content, have entrained our minds to overlook, even shun, the simple and uncomplicated, in favor of that which grabs attention with authority. It has become all too easy to look right past open spaces and the relevance of calm reflection. Take notice of how every television commercial and program utilizes an almost universal presentational format; a rapid-fire-flow of incessantly-shifting images. Gone is the camera’s lingering gaze upon the talking head or scenery. Instead we are confronted with flash-fire images that linger for no more than a second or two, and then make way for the next, and the next,… this is nothing less than mental entrainment, teaching us to expect and tolerate only quick sound bytes and millisecond images, to forego focused and prolonged attention on anything or anyone.

Instant Gratification and Perpetual Stimulus Now

We seek instant gratification and perpetual stimulus now, and if we have to spend even a few moments with ourselves and our deeper undercurrent of emotions in a space of quiet, it is considered a nearly intolerable thing, though few bother to articulate this, for to do so would require the lost mindfulness I here refer to. What would we do with ourselves if we didn’t have our phone screens to gaze into while standing at a street corner waiting for the light to change, or wandering a shopping mall, or riding an elevator? We’ve allowed ourselves to become trained to loathe a calm space of mind. I can palpably feel the cashier’s frustration in the air, as he or she is forced to stall their own motion and wait for me to count out my change, preferring instead to simply add more to my already burdening collection of coinage and have me move on so that they may serve the next in line.

Mind you, I don’t speak as one completely liberated from a state of impatience, for I feel it on the road when I am driving; too frequently hostile to the notion of simply being patient with the person ahead of me who I deem ‘too slow’ in the executing of their turn. I know what it’s like to feel in a hurry for no good reason, to feel those uncomfortable feelings of an unspecified nature and want to cover them over with a moment’s distraction. But I have grown even more uncomfortable with the frenetic vibration our culture imposes upon us as a fact of life now, and I clearly recognize the dissonance this flood of sensory stimuli is causing us in our ability to simple be, without doing, to actually listen to the person who is talking to us, rather than merely prepping our next words in our minds as they speak.

Plant Light

The Regular Practice of Meditation

I’ve taken to the regular practice of meditation over the last few months, and in so doing have gained a stark awareness of the connection between an endlessly whirring mind and the emotional state of dis-ease to which it gives birth. I have come to appreciate the spaces in between the stimuli, the capacity to become present to the silence in which all noise resides; that universal context within which all of life unfolds.
Take a moment and truly listen to it, deeply. You might have to search at first, but it is there. Can you hear it? You will recognize it because it has its own sound; not dissimilar to the super ultra-high-pitched tonal frequency heard in those hearing tests we’ve taken. Now become aware of your breathing, allowing yourself as you do, to get in touch with the feeling within your own body; it’s aches and pains, its fatigue and weight, its pockets of stress or muscular constriction and where they reside in your physicality. Keep breathing as you explore it; deeply, slowly. Just observe the incessant flow of random thoughts parading through your mind as you do this, but just let them all pass by, without clinging to any of them. Now feel your emotional space. If you had to articulate where in your body its epicenter resides, where would you point to? Are you feeling relaxed, or is there a current of anxiety there? Breathe as you feel this. Allow yourself to truly feel your inner space of being. Let whatever is there move through you with your every breathe, taking conscious note of what it is like to feel. I promise, it won’t destroy you. In fact, it will relax you, and it will release you from the grip of stress if you do allow yourself to feel it. Practice this regularly, and you will notice your points of focus and priorities start to shift, in both subtle and profound ways. You will become aware of how certain stimulus informs your emotional state, and if you remain committed to exploring those inner spaces of thought, feeling and emotion, you will regain your appreciation of calm space and simplicity again, and you will learn to appreciate your own individual sense of self that’s likely been buried beneath the vibratory resonance of the ‘bee hive’ – that virtually incessant voice of modern culture. What I am inviting you to here, is a process of exploration, not a singular event. So be patient with it, and remember; none of culture’s stimulus is going with you when you depart this world, but it’s possible that your sense of self just might.

G.

View
Philosophy Podcast E22: Yoga Sutras I 12 – 15

Practice and non-attachment are the keys to progress…

0

Explore the spiritual philosophy of India and see how it applies to your own life and situations. Host Sujantra McKeever of San Diego, CA, is the author of 5 books. He leads you on a journey to the East that ends up back in your own backyard. We hope you find an insight that truly hits home.

Ep 22: Practice and non-attachment are the keys to progress.

View
THE ABCs OF ENLIGHTENMENT Week 06: FAITH

As long as the good times stay that way, we don’t even think about asking God for help…

0

 

FAITH

 
As long as the good times stay that way, we don’t even think about asking God for help, since we are doing fine on our own. Then, when we hit the inevitable rough patch, the best prayer we can muster is: “Lord, I don’t know if You are real or not and even if You are real, I don’t know if You can hear me or not. And even if You can hear me, I know that You probably have a lot of other, more important things to do than to listen to me, especially since I haven’t talked to You, even thought of You, since Granny went overboard in that shuffleboard accident. And, being upset, I may have taken your name in vain, as they say, and more than just once or twice and naturally I still feel really, really bad about it. But if You are real and can hear me and can spare a couple of minutes and be a man about what happened there in the heat of the moment (Did you have to send the freakin’ sharks?!!) I need to tell you that I’m in a horrible mess. Okay, it’s my own fault, which I already know so I don’t need a big lecture, but what I really do need and pronto is some major help . . .”

Not exactly a Psalm of David.

David-Icon

By 18 century icon painter – Iconostasis of Kizhi monastery, Karelia, Russia, Public Domain. (Via Wikipedia)

When our problems miraculously solve themselves and practically overnight, at least we do the right thing and give credit where credit is due, offering thanks to our own awesome cleverness.
 

Life Here on Earth

 
Because life here on Earth almost seems to favor godlessness, with multitudes of nonbelievers doing fabulously well; there seems to be no urgency to decide whether or not to have spiritual faith, to believe in God. Then when life’s seemingly insurmountable problems like death, the Big One, start knocking on our door, we are forced to reconsider the issue. But it doesn’t have to be so worrisome, as Pascal’s Wager, the famous philosophical argument, illustrates: “Better to believe in God,” it postulates, “for if you are wrong and there is no God, then no harm, whereas if you do not believe, and there is a God, then you could be cruisin’ for a bruisin’.”

PYO

(I paraphrase, of course.)

Much of life is unknown. In fact, you could say that practically all of life is unknown. We sometimes say of someone, “They don’t know where their next meal is coming from,” which is certainly the case for 99.9 percent of the natural world and billions of our fellow human beings as well. And even when we do know, even when there’s food in the fridge and money in the bank, many dangers still lurk about menacingly. So understandably, we would like to believe that we are not alone in our struggles, that someone else or something else is as concerned about our wellbeing as we are. And this is where faith, as it is most commonly practiced, enters the picture.
 

Faith Enters the Picture

 
Yes, faith in this form is the belief that someone watches over us, loves us and cares that we do well; that something in the universe is on our side, assisting us in our struggle.
 
Screenshot from IMAX® 3D movie Hidden Universe showing the Helix Nebula in infrared
 
Animals know that they must be proactive, even ruthlessly so, in order to survive. That they must not only fight and kill to eat but even fight and kill preemptively, simply to avoid being eaten. They are not, like us, thinking that if they behave virtuously, if they are good and kind, then some higher power will be pleased enough with them to see that they are well taken care of. An exception, perhaps, being the family dog who—though he should by now trust that his bowl will be filled every night; should have some faith that his master still cares enough about him to take care of him—can never be absolutely sure and so remains fearful that his next meal may be his last; that the caring may stop. And should his master show any displeasure, he becomes very anxious that he will be put out; be made to suffer and perhaps perish.

Because our fundamental problem is also survival and survival always tries to avoid suffering—not only because it is uncomfortable but also is often a prelude to our demise—we, too, look to a higher power to save us, especially in times when our wellbeing is threatened. And much like the character at the beginning of this essay, we make impulsive appeals to a higher power when we find that our own resources, even those potentially available to us (the rich brother-in-law, for example) have become exhausted or are now simply sick and tired of us.
 

Struggling to Survive

 
I’m not saying that all believers, all those who have faith that there is a higher, benevolent power lovingly watching over them, are dogs, but rather that because life is in an epic struggle against death, it naturally seeks every survival advantage and will pray to a higher power if it believes (has faith) it is in a position to help. And in our human case, will further believe that the higher power it appeals to is the Ultimate One, is the immortal Creator of life itself, and therefore if pleased with us (okay, like the dog’s master) will grant us an eternally blissful life. (Or if displeased, will condemn us to suffer, also eternally, it is believed.)
 
jetski-655554_1280
 
Every cell in us, indeed, every atom, is struggling to survive and notwithstanding the fact that everything in the physical universe is mortal (even the photon, the building block of light itself, born at the beginning and as old as the universe itself, will ultimately perish in creation’s final act), all kinds of notions are entertained and to the degree that they appeal to our survival instincts, are more likely to be believed. Even to the extent that if someone is certain that his God has given him, and him exclusively, eternal life, and someone else comes along who is certain that his God has given him, and him exclusively, eternal life, both will feel they have the divine right to fight, even to slay their adversary. That’s how powerful and potentially aggressive this survival instinct is!
 

One Immortal Life

 
So while religious faith, the way it’s most commonly practiced, is often nothing more than the belief that our beliefs and only our beliefs will give us a more fortunate life as well as bestow upon us a unique immortality, there is another type of faith: the simple belief that life, or the Life, is conscious, loving, and aspires in and through us to goals which are good. And further, that It will assist us in our struggle because we are in a position to assist It in Its Struggle.

That there is only one immortal Life in the universe and all are part and parcel of this one Life and our struggle is therefore Its Struggle, is the tenet at the heart of this type of faith.

 

Look for the next topic, Gratitude, next week! Can’t wait to until then to read more? Order The ABCs ofThe ABCs of Enlightenment cover Enlightenment: A Mystical Primer today.

 

Jeffrey BakerJeffrey Baker was a student for more than forty years of Sri Chinmoy, who named him Kalatit (Kal, time; atit, beyond). Called “our preeminent humorist” by his teacher, he was a frequent contributor to publications and events in his spiritual community and elsewhere. A card-carrying Baby Boomer, he attended the Woodstock Festival, performed in various rock-and-roll ensembles, and has a degree in ecology from The University of Connecticut. He’s been a gardener for the Rockefellers in Pocantico Hills, New York, and “the piano tuner to the stars” working with artists such as Billy Joel, Chick Corea, Herbie Hancock, Richard Goode and Andre Previn. He has composed more than one hundred works in the classical as well as the theatrical genres. (https://www.reverbnation.com/jeffreybaker) His The Music of the Zodiac, has had more than 40,000 downloads. His corpus of philosophical treatises, Eat My Dust, Martin Luther, as well as a collection of epigrams, 1000 Pearls of Wisdom, and a group of essays on contemporary subjects, Blah, Blah, Blah, are available as e-books (Amazon) and in paperback (Createspace).

View
THE ABCs OF ENLIGHTENMENT Week 05: ENLIGHTENMENT

If you have been reading these essays from the beginning then you already know that in the East they believe that God…

0

ENLIGHTENMENT

 

God and His Heavenly Kingdom Are Within You

If you have been reading these essays from the beginning then you already know that in the East they believe that God and His Heavenly Kingdom are within you and discoverable. If, however, you started reading here, believing that, being the title chapter, it would be, like, the best part ever, then I wish to tell you that in the East they believe that God and His Heavenly Kingdom are within you and discoverable and in order for you to find out whether the “best part ever” thing is true, you will have to read a little more. Sorry.

When we think of enlightenment, we immediately think of the Buddha, or maybe Keanu Reeves, who portrayed him in 1993’s Little Buddha, and that would be unfortunate. For while both the movie and he, of course, looked good; steeped in the cadence of surf speak, of “Dude, that’s totally gnarly,” Keanu’s performance was sort of bogus. So much so that on the night I went, when he delivered the line “Come my disciples, eat my rice,” it reached critical mass and the entire theater just cracked up, for suddenly we were watching Ted ‘Theodore’ Logan (his signature role in Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure) Under the Bodhi Tree. But if you thought that his portrayal was, like, okay, the most amped ever, then I apologize and all right, the crowd that night was, like, okay, a bunch of squid-lips and stuff.

Eternally Self-Transcending

Anyway, one commonality in the movie and the Buddha’s legend, if you are at all familiar with it, is the presence of numerous sadhus (“ascetics”) sometimes naked (try not to look down), who, when they aren’t being total dweebs, are meditating.

In Essay #3, Consciousness, we learned that 5000 years ago the Rishis in the Indus Valley discovered meditation and employed it for self-discovery. It’s important to note, however, that they did not just sit down, go deep within, and immediately arrive at their own highest height. (Or, in truth, ever absolutely arrive, this ultimate goal being eternally self-transcending. Whoa! Epic, Dude!)

Still, there are landmarks along the way and enlightenment is one such signpost and depending upon whom you talk to, perhaps even the most advanced. Though some will say that enlightenment is a misnomer; that when Prince Siddhartha became the Buddha it was God-realization that he attained because enlightenment is more like a higher state of illumination and, as such, actually lower than complete God-consciousness. And those persons are probably those same naked sadhus who, unable to meditate twenty-four hours a day, argue about things like this mostly, I suppose, just to pass the time or maybe to try and take their minds off the fact that they are so freakin’, tired, hungry, and cold.

Higher States of Consciousness

But for our purposes and those of newbies everywhere, we will simply construct two categories: higher states of consciousness that you can descend from and those from which you cannot descend. When Siddhartha, seated at the foot of the Bodhi tree in Sri Chinmoy’s play, Siddhartha Becomes the Buddha, declares, “Here I shall realize the Truth. Until I put an end to sorrow, I shall not move from this spot,” it is this latter condition that he seeks.

In our popular song “Amazing Grace,” we find the line, “I once was lost, but now am found. Was blind but now I see,” and also “to save a wretch like me,” and as a song about redemption and the beautiful and rarefied experience of God’s grace, it reverberates to our very core. But we also know that even if we are lucky enough to have this experience, it’s still also pretty easy to fall from grace; to “wretch” once more, so to speak. Which is why this experience of becoming aware of God’s compassionate presence within one’s self is considered, in mystical circles, an “awakening” and thought of as a first step. Not in any disparaging or condescending way (sadhus take note), for mysticism, like the religions, also recognizes that the inspiration to set forth on our quest, the source of this grace, is God Himself.

We are lost. We are blind. We are deaf and dumb, too.

We are lost. We are blind. We are deaf and dumb, too. Then God touches our hearts with His Grace and suddenly we wake up and begin seeking Him—an absolutely profound and totally essential experience, for if God does not call us to Him we would remain lost; wandering in the desert. But because mysticism believes that He is calling us in order that we might begin the process of reuniting ourselves with Him, finally and absolutely, it feels that this awakening is not the end; not the fruit at the top of the tree, but the seed that inspires the seeker to begin their journey back to a permanent state of God-consciousness. (Did you know that the giant Sequoia, 300 feet tall and 100 feet in circumference and therefore the largest by volume of any tree on Earth, begins as a seed smaller than a flake of oatmeal? Also, that its germ can only be released by fire? I shudder!)

So knowing that awakening is an exceptional condition, not only to receive but especially to maintain, that “what comes up has to come down,” and believing that a permanent state of God-consciousness is possible, mystics employ meditation to “limit their downside potential,” to borrow a phrase from the business world. Still, meditation is not the actual experience but the tool; not the signal, let us say, which comes from God, but more like the tuner on a radio that must be carefully adjusted until it hones in on the proper frequency.

You Will Need Complete Self-Mastery

Science estimates the number of human beings who have ever lived to be roughly 100 billion, give or take 25 billion or so. (The number depends upon when you consider modern man to have first appeared.) And I’m about to take an even greater statistical leap and guess that the number of humans who have ever found themselves in Prince Siddhartha’s exact psychic condition, to be truly crying for reunification with the Highest, to be only a few hundred or so. Then really jump off the numerical cliff and say that even among those, the number able to complete their journey and become enlightened, permanently God-realized, is perhaps a few dozen at best.

This is because, as illustrated in the film, the play and the legend, you will need complete self-mastery as you are drawn up through the higher realms in order to remain one-pointedly focused on your goal. For the energies that occupy the various realities within you and around you will create every imaginable disruption, just as you might encounter in one of your weirdest and most disturbing dreams. Therefore, it is difficult beyond compare. And many sadhus and others who have practiced spiritual disciplines for decades, when at last they have begun their true ascent, for want of this indomitable inner will, have failed to attain a permanent higher consciousness and have had to descend again. But I’ll never say, “Serves them right” (maybe the other sadhus will), for what they have undertaken is, by far and away, the most difficult thing imaginable.

Mount_Everest

Pic via Wikipedia

The Highest Mountain

The highest mountain in the world at 29,035 feet is Mt. Everest, “discovered” in 1853 and named in 1865 in honor of the British surveyor general of India, even though for centuries it had been known in Nepal as Sagarmatha and in Tibet as Chomolungma, “Goddess Mother of the World”—much in the same way that Columbus “discovered” America in 1492, to the surprise, and later, chagrin of the Native Americans who must have been hard-pressed to try and figure out exactly where they had been living for tens of thousands of years. (In North America we liked most of their place names enough to keep them, anyway. More than half our states and thousands of our cities, counties, and other divisions in America have such ancient names. Connecticut is Mohegan from Quinnehtukqut meaning “beside the long tidal river.” Manhattan is Algonquian, and means “isolated by water.” There are thousands of other examples.)

Many people have been inspired to climb Everest, while the rest of humanity will ask, “What on Earth would make anyone want to do that?” To which George Mallory, who lost his life in 1924 on his third attempt to be the first to summit, famously answered, “Because it is there.” And this is perhaps the closest parallel to the pursuit of enlightenment that we have. Except that if you are successful in your inner climb, if you become enlightened, then you can stay at the peak, can remain eternally God-conscious and never have to descend.

Look for the next topic, Faith, next week! Can’t wait to until then to read more? Order The ABCs ofThe ABCs of Enlightenment cover Enlightenment: A Mystical Primer today.

 

Jeffrey BakerJeffrey Baker was a student for more than forty years of Sri Chinmoy, who named him Kalatit (Kal, time; atit, beyond). Called “our preeminent humorist” by his teacher, he was a frequent contributor to publications and events in his spiritual community and elsewhere. A card-carrying Baby Boomer, he attended the Woodstock Festival, performed in various rock-and-roll ensembles, and has a degree in ecology from The University of Connecticut. He’s been a gardener for the Rockefellers in Pocantico Hills, New York, and “the piano tuner to the stars” working with artists such as Billy Joel, Chick Corea, Herbie Hancock, Richard Goode and Andre Previn. He has composed more than one hundred works in the classical as well as the theatrical genres. (https://www.reverbnation.com/jeffreybaker) His The Music of the Zodiac, has had more than 40,000 downloads. His corpus of philosophical treatises, Eat My Dust, Martin Luther, as well as a collection of epigrams, 1000 Pearls of Wisdom, and a group of essays on contemporary subjects, Blah, Blah, Blah, are available as e-books (Amazon) and in paperback (Createspace).

View
Pilgrimage of the Heart Meditation Podcast E09

In this episode Sujantra skips his usual spoken introduction and goes directly into a meditation. Then, a visiting Sri Chinmoy devotee…

0

The Pilgrimage of the Heart Mediation Podcast is a recorded broadcast of Sujantra’s weekly Tuesday night meditation class held in San Diego California. Each week Sujantra introduces a new topic related to meditation and leads the class through various types of meditations including: visual concentration, yogic concentration, breathing techniques, chanting and much more.

Ep 09: In this episode Sujantra skips his usual spoken introduction and goes directly into a meditation. Then, a visiting Sri Chinmoy devotee with a British accent, named Devashishu, leads the class through some meditative mantras.

View
The Pilgrimage of the Heart Philosophy Podcast E06

In this episode Sujantra reads about Vishvakarma from the Ramayana…

0

Explore the spiritual philosophy of India and see how it applies to your own life and situations. Host Sujantra McKeever of San Diego, CA, is the author of 5 books. He leads you on a journey to the East that ends up back in your own backyard.

Ep 06: In this episode Sujantra reads about Vishvakarma from the Ramayana.

View